Migration, Cities, and Engaged Scholarship

By Kelsey P. Norman for Denver Dialogues. Protesters gather in Washington, DC, against President Trump’s proposed ‘Muslim Ban.’ Photo via Ted Eytan. On April 3, 2018, just prior to the start of the annual meeting of the International Studies Association (ISA) in San Francisco, I co-organized (along with Dr. Hans Schattle) a working group titled…

On April 3, 2018, just prior to the start of the annual meeting of the International Studies Association (ISA) in San Francisco, I co-organized (along with Dr. Hans Schattle) a working group titled “Cities and the Contentious Politics of Migration,” co-sponsored by the Ethnicity, Migration & Citizenship and International Ethics sections. The idea behind the workshop arose from the previous year’s ISA meeting in Baltimore, which took place just weeks after President Trump’s first issuance of the now infamous ‘Muslim Ban.’

This year, with San Francisco’s role as a historic and contemporary sanctuary city and its ongoing battle with the federal government, we decided on a theme that examined the role of cities as sites of migration politics, local integration, and contention. Some of the questions we wanted to address included: How do migrants and refugees benefit urban environments? What challenges do they pose to political or community coherence? What are the inherent tensions among federal-level, state-level, and city-level migration policies? And how do civil society actors and networks advocate for migrant and refugee rights within today’s politics of migration?

via Migration, Cities, and Engaged Scholarship — Political Violence at a Glance

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